Depth to Plant
Spacing Between Plants
Spacing Between Rows
Days to Germinate (Sprout)
Soil Temp
Planting Season
Plant Height
No. of Plants per sq. ft.
Soil Requirements

Shop Radish Seeds
1/4" deep

Space plants about 2" - 3" apart

Make rows about 8" - 10" apart

7 - 14 days 50F - 85F Winter
Appx. 12" tall 16 plants per sq. ft. Prefers soil with pH levels of 6.0 - 7.5.

Cultivation & History (source)

About Radish

Radishes are a fast growing, cool-season crop that can be harvested in as little as twenty days. There are well over 200 varieties: including French radishes, daikon radishes, and other specialty varieties in a surprising array of colors, including white, purple, black, and even green. Eaten raw they can be whole, sliced, diced, or grated. You can also cook and pickle them. Most of them are typically eaten fresh, and make a good addition to salad or a substitute to pepper on a sandwich.

Radishes require a spot with full sun, fertile soil and good drainage. Some varieties can be grown in partial shade. They will thrive in cool, moist soil. In cooler climates they can be planted in both the spring and fall. In warmer climates they should be grown over winter.

When to Plant

Radishes are particularly sensitive to any interruptions to their growth, and consequently are best direct seeded outdoors. They are sensitive to frost, but if required, they can be sown indoors about 2 weeks prior to the first frost. If sown indoors, use a biodegradable pot so that you can plant the whole pot when it comes time to transplant them outdoors to minimize disruptions to their root system. Whether you plant indoors or out, the most important thing is to keep the soil moist. Sow seeds about 1/2“ deep and about an inch apart, with 8-12” between rows, depending on how large your variety is. Once the radishes begin to grow, you can thin them to about every 2”.

Radishes can be sown wherever there is an empty space, from early spring until early summer, and starting again in the early fall. They make useful "row markers" sown among slow germinating plants like carrots and parsnips. By the time the carrots or parsnips have germinated, it is close to the time to harvest the radishes. Since they germinate in a few days, it makes weeding between the rows much easier.

How to Harvest

Radishes are at their best for a very short time. If they are left in the ground too long, they will develop a sharp taste and a pithy texture, and their roots will eventually split. Radishes are ready to harvest in as little as 20 days, depending on the variety. Once the root has become plump, they are ready to pick. Harvest the whole crop once it matures, and store them in the refrigerator. If harvesting in hot weather, pull radishes from the soil and drop into a bucket of cold water. Remove greens and refrigerate for up to 3 weeks. Storage can be extended up to several months in a properly maintained root cellar.